• Vogel State Park - Blairsville

    One of Georgia’s oldest and most beloved state parks, Vogel is located at the base of Blood Mountain in the Chattahoochee National Forest.  Driving from the south, visitors pass through Neel Gap, a beautiful mountain pass near Brasstown Bald, the highest point in Georgia.

  • Meeks Park - Blairsville

    One of the most beautiful parks in north Georgia! Whether it’s the Sorghum Festival, the very popular Scottish Festival and Highland Games, the Butternut Creek Festival, or just enjoying the many trails throughout the park – you definitely want to make this a stop if you are visiting our area. List of festivals

  • Unicoi State Park - Helen

    Nestled in the north Georgia mountains just outside Helen, Unicoi is one of Georgia’s most beloved state parks. Outdoor enthusiasts can enjoy hiking and mountain biking on scenic mountain trails, including an easy lake loop, challenging trek to Anna Ruby Falls, pretty three-mile trail to downtown Helen and rugged 8-mile singletrack for bikers. The cool mountain lake offers a swimming beach and canoe rental during summer.

  • Lake Nottely

    Lake Nottely Reservoir lies in the state of Georgia on the southeastern edge of the Georgia River watershed, nestled in the mountains and valleys of the Chattahoochee National Forest. The Lake Nottely lake is 20 miles long and has 4,180 surface acres at normal summer pool elevations. Construction of Lake Nottely Dam began in 1941 and was completed in 1942. The dam is 184 feet high and stretches 2,300 feet across the Nottely River. Nottely has a flood-storage capacity of 100,000 acre-feet. Full pool is at 1,779 feet above M.S.L. Nottely Lake is totally in Union County, and is a 4,180-acre TVA lake with 106 miles of shoreline nestled in the mountains just northwest of Blairsville.

  • Lake Winfield Scott Recreation Area

    Lake Winfield Scott Recreation Area offers visitors year-round recreation opportunities including camping, picnicking, boating, swimming and hiking, all centered around beautiful Lake Winfield Scott.

    The area is situated high in a mountain valley within the Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest, approximately 80 miles from Atlanta, Georgia. The facility offers a rental cabin with electricity and water, as well as sites for tent and RV camping.

    Natural Features:

    The recreation area includes 18-acre Lake Winfield Scott, which forms the headwaters of Cooper Creek. The lake was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the 1930s.

    A variety of wildlife makes its home in the surrounding forest, including deer, bear, wild turkey, grouse and songbirds.

    Recreation:

    The Lake Winfield Scott Beach includes a designated swimming area, picnic tables, a bathhouse, pavilions (by reservation only), a playground and trash bins.

    Day-use hiking trails are found within the recreation area, ideal for a short stroll. A 0.4-mile trail parallels the lakeshore. In addition, the 1-mile Jarrard Gap Trail and 2.7-mile Slaughter Creek Trail both begin within the recreation area and connect to the Appalachian Trail.

    Lake Winfield Scott is open to hand-powered and electric motor boats only. Fishing for catfish, trout, perch, brim and bass is a popular activity. See the Georgia Department of Natural Resources for a complete listing of freshwater fishing regulations for the lake. A boat ramp and accessible fishing dock provide year-round lake access.

    Facilities:

    Lake Winfield Scott Recreation Area’s cabin is a short walk to the lake, and can accommodate up to 12 people. A sleeping area upstairs is furnished with six twin beds and three double beds, all with mattresses. Visitors must provide their own bed and bath linens.

    The main floor houses a living room with wood stove (no wood provided), dining room and kitchen, which is equipped with a refrigerator, electric stove, microwave, assorted pots and pans, utensils, plates, glasses, cups and flatware. The bathroom has a flush toilet, shower and an electric heater.

    Lake Winfield Scott Recreation Area’s campground consists of 31 campsites configured in two loops for tent or RV camping. Showers, flush and vault toilets, grills, picnic tables and lantern posts are provided. The campground has no dump station, water or electric hookups.

    Nearby Attractions:

    Suches, Georgia is five miles southwest of the recreation area and offers a general store and fuel station.

    Blairsville, Georgia is 16 miles north on U.S. Highway 19/129 and offers the nearest full-service grocery stores and shopping villages.

  • Track Rock Gap Archaeological Site

    The Track Rock Gap rock art and stone landscape sites on the Chattahoochee National Forest were created by Creek and Cherokee people beginning more than 1,000 years ago. There is no archeological evidence of any Mayan connection to the sites. Learn more about how the Forest Service works closely with Creek and Cherokee tribal governments to manage, protect and better understand these important, sacred ceremonial sites. View a video of members of the Muscogee Creek Nation and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians specializing in historic preservation debunking the Mayan myth, and explaining what the site means to their peoples and why it’s so important to protect it.